creativity · play

“The Legographer”: A Tiny, Adventurous Lego Photographer Remind Us to Re-View the World

U.K.-based photographer Andrew Whyte shows us the world through the lens of a small artist in a new photo series called “The Legographer.” These expertly composed photos, which Whyte took on his iPhone every day for a year, feature a Lego Man, rocking a Lego knit cap instead of the famous bowl cut, lugging around a Lego camera and taking pictures that we will never see. Despite his diminutive size, this little guy seems to have had some big adventures. He scales buildings, he’s chased by a hermit crab, and slips on a giant (to him) banana peel. You know, typical photographer stuff.

I am always inspired by these kinds of exercises in playfulness and just remembering to view the world from a different angle from time to time.

See all the photos here: Everything About These Pictures Of A Tiny, Adventurous Lego Photographer is Awesome | Co.Create | creativity + culture + commerce

architecture · community · creativity · design · environment · play · Social

The Games These Benches Play « The Dirt

Playful design in an urban environment? My favorite!

Clever and talented Danish artist Jeppe Hein has been custom-making his “Modified Social Benches” for museums, arts festivals, and plazas since the mid-2000s. Most recently, he created a unique set of art you can sit on for Beaufort04, the fourth Triennial of Contemporary Art by the Sea this summer in Belgium. Kids, cool kids, and adults all seem to love playing with these.

Hein says his powder-coated aluminium “social benches” borrow their basic form from the standard park bench, but are altered to make the “act of sitting on them a conscious physical endeavor.” As they mutate, the benches become spaces to “inhabit,” rather than just places to park it and relax for a moment.

more via The Games These Benches Play « The Dirt.

 

The pieces may seem like fun one-offs, but something then happens between the work and the community: “As is the case with much of Hein’s work, the Modified Social Benches on the dyke in De Haan seem to hide behind a disguise of fun and entertainment. But what they actually evoke is a process of interaction and communication that works on different levels.”

Check out more at ASLA’s blog The Dirt.